Friday, June 27, 2014

Pattycake


Oh, yeah, of course.  I know that because it's by George Platt Lynes, it's art.

But all I can say is that this kind of art has an impact that Cezanne can only dream of. And on some Fridays, it's just the kind of thing that one ought to spend some time contemplating.  Who says art isn't practical?  I'm feeling better already.

6 comments:

  1. It's all about the light on the fuzz on the legs.

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    1. Ah, but isn't that so often the case?

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  2. I just remembered something: for years, I had this picture hanging in my room. I bought a postcard of it at the old anarchist bookshop on Spruce Street in West Philadelphia (where I also bought my two-volume edition of the memoirs of Emma Goldman - oh, I was very radical, once upon a time). Also in that array of found images (the postcard-and-scotch-tape equivalent of blogs, really: Picasso's Gertrude Stein, Seurat's Sunday afternoon, an early Josephine Baker portrait, and Bowie, circa "Young Americans." Maybe it's because we're moving again, but I'm becoming consumed with nostalgia...

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    1. You were much more cerebral and artistic than I was, dear Muscato. My freshman year dorm room bulletin board was all pop and camp - postcards of the Supremes, Rocky Horror, Lucille Ball, Disney, Klinger in drag from MASH, Dreamgirls, various nuns, the Little Rascals. Oh it was tragic in hindsight. It all just screamed, "GAY! But no idea what to do about it?"

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    2. Well, it was only a year or two later that I got a huge Marlene poster and had it over my bed - and then felt like Suzanne Vega was singing to me to with "Marlene on the Wall." So pop culture figured in there, as well (there may also have been some DuranDuranabilia, but that I will neither confirm nor deny).

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    3. I often get nostalgic about tight young butts, art or no art. Jx

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